Polish School Honors Jewish Girls Expelled By Nazis

A polish school in Krakow revealed a panel containing the names of 87 Jewish girls, who were expelled during the Second World War in 1939 during the Nazi occupation of Poland.

The Polish city of Krakow is part of a growing interest and willingness to commemorate the Jews, who lived there prior to the Holocaust.

The event took place at Adam Mickiewicz Junior Secondary School, and commemorated the 125th anniversary of the founding of the school. Before the Nazi occupation, the school housed many Jewish students, and was an all-girls school.

Lital Beer, director of the Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem, Israel found that 87 Jewish girls were expelled. She discovered that 21 were killed in the Holocaust, 24 survived; the fate of the other 42 unknown.  The difficulty trying to trace names, was especially trying since many changed their names more than once, often to Hebrew if they settled in Israel, or changed their last names through marriage.

The research project lasted two years, and began with a request from the school’s principle, Gabriela Olszowska to locate the whereabouts and fate of the former students. Beer added that Yad Vashem gets many requests to conduct private research for individuals, but is usually unable to carry out many of them. However, special attention was given to this case.

“I was very moved by the principal’s initiative to research the [fate of the] girls and commemorate them,” Beer said. “We want to embrace those initiatives as much as we can.”

Source: Israel Hayom

Image: Ynet

by: Efrat Baron